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Under the Wave off Kanagawa Hokusai

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Under the Wave off Kanagawa
Hokusai, Katsushika. “Under the Wave off Kanagawa (Kanagawa-Oki Nami-Ura), Also Known as the Great Wave, from the Series Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku Sanj?rokkei).” Google Arts And Culture, Nishimuraya Yohachi, artsandculture.google.com/asset/under-the-wave-off-kanagawa-kanagawa-oki-nami-ura-also-known-as-the-great-wave-from-the-series-thirty-six-views-of-mount-fuji-fugaku-sanj?rokkei/BgFNq2kbIcTbFg.

Under the Wave off Kanagawa created by Hokusai in 1830-32 of which a copy of it is housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art is an easily recognizable piece of Japanese artwork, which shows the power of nature in action. Hokusai Under the Wave off Kanagawa is one of a set of prints depicting the landscape around Mount Fuji. They were printed from carved wooden blocks, each block being one layer of color. Under the Wave off Kanagawa depicts a colossal wave crashing into Mount Fuji; it demonstrates the use of contrast between the indigo water and the beige sky, and represents the raw power of nature.

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In Hokusai’s iconic piece depicts a massive wave off the coast of Edo, what is known as present day as Tokyo, Japan. In the foreground three small fishing boats are shown, one on the left, one on the right and one in the center, all directly in the path of the wave. The wave itself is in the left third so massive, that it occupies the top middle and bottom third of the left side. Ihe wave is colored with bright whites and deep prussian blue. Mount Fuji is visible in the background of the middle third. The background of the image is a baege tan horizon. The event The wave is crashing over the fisherman The curves of the wave crest and on the edges the white foam of the water churning, but the trough of the wave show the ripples of the water’s surface. The edges of the wave are almost claw or tentacle like as if to show that they will grab a boat or man and pull them to the depths. Hokusai’s uses cool colors to create a somber mood and the direction of the curving lines create a sense of motion often associated with sea sickness.

Hokusai is representing the power of nature which should be respected. The sailors on the boats can be seen rowing for their life. The power of the wave is evident from its size, which would appear to dwarf Mount Fuji.
Hokusai, Katsushika. “Under the Wave off Kanagawa (Kanagawa-Oki Nami-Ura), Also Known as the Great Wave, from the Series Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku Sanj?rokkei).” Google Arts And Culture, Nishimuraya Yohachi, artsandculture.google.com/asset/under-the-wave-off-kanagawa-kanagawa-oki-nami-ura-also-known-as-the-great-wave-from-the-series-thirty-six-views-of-mount-fuji-fugaku-sanj?rokkei/BgFNq2kbIcTbFg.1076325114300
It is the most reproduced piece of Japanese art and has been recreated, transformed or revamped millions of times. The piece is so widespread that it has even been made into an emoji. Many people see the wave as if it were trying to pull the fisherman in to the depths. Vincent van Gogh, responding to a letter expressed this effect, “Hokusai makes you cry out the same thing — but in his case with his lines, his drawing, since in your letter you say to yourself: these waves are claws, the boat is caught in them, you can feel it.”.

Under the Wave off Kanagawa is showing the power and beauty of nature through a huge wave, crashing onto sailors. Hokusai’s Under the Wave off Kanagawa is one of the most easily recognizable pieces of Japanese artwork in the world, being recreated thousands of times it has become a pop culture icon.

Works Cited
(Image Citation)
Hokusai, Katsushika. “Under the Wave off Kanagawa (Kanagawa-Oki Nami-Ura), Also Known as the Great Wave, from the Series Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku Sanj?rokkei).” Google Arts And Culture, Nishimuraya Yohachi, artsandculture.google.com/asset/under-the-wave-off-kanagawa-kanagawa-oki-nami-ura-also-known-as-the-great-wave-from-the-series-thirty-six-views-of-mount-fuji-fugaku-sanj?rokkei/BgFNq2kbIcTbFg.

(Research Citation)
van Gogh, Vincent. “676.” 726 (730, 564): To Theo Van Gogh. Arles, Monday, 17 or Tuesday, 18 December 1888. – Vincent Van Gogh Letters, VanGoghLetters.org, vangoghletters.org/vg/letters/let676/letter.html.

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