John Steinbeck depicts Lennie and George as having the best friendship on the planet and keeping in mind that George professes to not require Lennie

John Steinbeck depicts Lennie and George as having the best friendship on the planet and keeping in mind that George professes to not require Lennie, he realizes that he needs Lennie as much as Lennie needs him. The common connection between George and Lennie is a veritable fellowship between two altogether different men. Lennie, a rationally impaired, enormous man with emerging highlights and George, the little intense person, with the brains. As the two men are attempting to escape from a disaster that Lennie is in the blame for, George backs him up. George and Lennie met one day when George was conversing with his companions and advised Lennie to bounce off of an extension that they were both on. Since Lennie is slow-witted he endeavored this brainless demonstration and nearly suffocated. George feeling incredible sensitivity for Lennie thought of it as a commitment to be companions with Lennie to pay him back. As the two became more acquainted with one another they wound up extraordinary companions and didn’t stop. Realizing that Lennie was disabled, George would dependably deal with him like a “cousin”. George demonstrates that a decent companionship depends on what somebody’s identity resembles, not what they look like outwardly. George sticks around with Lennie notwithstanding when Lennie makes numerous missteps and nearly places George into peril. On page 34 George and Slim have a discussion. “You guys travel around together”