In addition to this

In addition to this, the conscription crisis in 1918 which aimed to conscript 550,000 men including 150,000 from Ireland generated immense opposition and hugely increased resentment towards the British which helped advance the revolutionary cause. Revolutionary nationalism’s success in achieving mass support is specifically evident in the general elections of 1918, where Sinn Fein won 73 seats thus having a democratic mandate for independence unlike the IPP which only secured 6 in comparison to 68 in 1910 therefore emphasizing the lack of interest towards constitutional nationalism among the Irish people. In comparison, constitutional nationalism achieved far less in terms of both reforms and popular encouragement. The negotiations in 1918 which resulted with both sides agreeing to a partition was a temporary success, as key unionists refused to countenance an immediate grant of home rule causing the discussion to collapse and many to abandon Redmond and join Sin Fein, furthermore highlighting the failure of constitutional nationalism. Also, the establishment of Dail set up by Sinn Fein was hugely symbolic and another significant contribution to nationalism, as Sinn Fein now had its own provisional government which set up its own courts and collected taxes. The support for Dail by the Irish people and the IRA under Michael Collins signified the lack of loyalty towards the British and its illegitimacy in ruling Ireland, therefore emphasizing the success of revolutionary nationalism and its acceptance by the majority in Ireland.