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Comprehensive Program Plan Madison Rowe

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Comprehensive Program Plan
Madison Rowe, Rachel Handel, David May
East Carolina University
Table of Contents
The Community………………………………………………………………………………….4
Demographics……………………………………………………………………………4
Geographical Variables………………………………………………………….……….

Seasonal Variables……………………………………………………………………
Economic Conditions……………………………………………………………………
Availability of Resources and Services …………………………………………………
The Agency…………………………………………………………………………………….

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Description………….…………………………………………………………………
Mission and Vision……………………………………………………………………
Accreditation……………………………………………………………………………
Administration and Structure…………………………………………………………
Resources…………………………………………………………………………
Staff……………………………………………………………………
Facilities……………………………………………………………………
Budget……………………………………………………………………
Therapeutic Recreation Department……………………………………………………………
RT Department Background and History……………………………………………
RT Department Mission………………………………………………………….

Staff………………………………………………………………………………………….

Skills, Abilities, Credentials and Job Description of RT…………………………….

Staff Increase……………………………………………………………………….

Contract Services……………………………………………………………………….
Volunteers and Guidelines………………………………………………………………
Internships and Guidelines………………………………………………………………
Facilities……………………………………………………………………………………….

Exclusive/ Shared Facilities……………………………………………………………
Equipment and Supplies……………………………………………………………
Transportation……………………………………………………………………….

Budget……………………………………………………………………………………….

Justifications……………………………………………………………………….
Item Line budget (move to appendix) …………………………………………
Clients…………………………………………………………………………………….

Number of Clients…………………………………………………………………………

Demographics……………………………………………………………………….

Diagnoses/ Disabilities………………………………………………………………
Primary
Secondary……………………………………………………………………….

Leisure Related Needs……………………………………………………………………
Therapeutic Recreation Profession………………………………………………………………
Philosophy……………………………………………………………………….

Impact of Standards of Practice/ Code of Ethics……………………………………….
Credentials/Professional Preparation………………………………………………………
Memberships and Continuing Education………………………………………………
Other Professional Resources……………………………………………………………
References……………………………………………………………………….

Appendices…………………………………………………………………………………………3
Appendix A- Map of Miami……………………………………………………………………
Appendix B- Climate Chart of Miami……………………………………………………………
Appendix C- Average Temperature of Palmetto Bay
Appendix D- Miami Precipitation and Temperature Plots 2017
Appendix E- Miami Precipitation and Temperature Plots 2018
Appendix F- Unemployment Rates
Appendix G- Service Routes
Appendix H- Mission and Vision Statement/ ATRA Code of ethics
Appendix I- Organizational Chart
Appendix J- Areas CARF Accredits
Appendix K- Volunteer Form Example
Appendix L- Florida Volunteer Protection Act
Appendix M- Funding Opportunity Example
Appendix N- Item Line Budget
Appendix O-
Appendix P-
Appendix Q-
Appendix R-
Appendix S-
Appendix T-
Appendix U-
Appendix V-
Appendix W-
Appendix X-
Appendix Y-
Appendix Z-
The Community
Our agency is found in Miami, Florida and serves the surrounding counties, specifically Miami-Dade County- Palmetto Bay area. Recovery bay is one of the only residential treatment facilities found in Miami- Dade County and serves any residents or non-residents of Miami. The population of Palmetto Bay is 24,600 people and is a suburban area located south of Miami.
Demographics: Miami is home to wide range of nationalities, with the largest being Cuban at an astounding 34.1% of the entire population. According to the world populations review,” the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) also ranked Miami first terms of its percentage of foreign-born residents at 59%.” (Miami, Florida Population, 2018). The population of Miami is 78.6% white, 18.2% Black or African American, 1.6% Asian, 68.6% Hispanic or Latino of any race and 13.25 non-Hispanic or Latino. “Hispanics may be of any race, so also are included in applicable race categories” (U.S Census Bureau, n.d). Miami is a very diverse city and is home to 2.8 million people and is increasing at a rate of 3.28% within the past year (U.S Census Bureau, n.d). 19.4% of citizens of Miami, under the age of 65 do not have health insurance and 6.0% of people living in Miami have a disability. According to the census of 2016, only 972,716 people were employed and in all of Miami, the poverty rate is 18.2% (U.S Census Bureau, n.d). The female to male ratio of Miami-Dade County 51.4% to 48.6% (U.S Census Bureau, n.d).
Geographical Variables: According to City-Data, “Miami’s year-round semi-tropical climate is free of extremes in temperature, with a long, warm summer and abundant rainfall followed by a mild, dry winter. Summer humidity levels—usually in the 86 to 89 percent range during the day—make Miami the second most humid city in the United States” (City-Data, 2018). The annual average temperature is 76.7 ° F with the annual precipitation at 58.53 inches and is only 12 feet above sea level (City-Data, 2018). See Appendix B for chart of Miami Climate. Miami is a naturally protected harbor that is bordered by the Biscayne Bay and is sheltered from the Atlantic Ocean. (City-Data, 2018) See Appendix A for Map of Miami. Miami-Dade County is located on the southeastern tip of Florida and 1/3 of the county is located in the Everglades national park. Miami-Dade County is larger than Delaware and Rhode Island at an astounding 2,000 square miles. (Miami-Dade County, 2018) “Miami-Dade County is comprised of 34 municipalities; each municipality has its own government and provides city services such as police and zoning protection.” (At a Glance, 2018). Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center is located in Miami- Dade County, specifically the municipality Palmetto Bay, and sits on 3 acres of land that has easy beach access and lots of room for the treatment centers clients and staff to complete both indoor and outdoor treatments.
Seasonal Variables- According to Weather spark, “In Palmetto Bay, the summers are long, hot, oppressive, wet, and mostly cloudy and the winters are short, comfortable, humid, windy, and mostly clear. The hot season lasts for 3.9 months, from June 2 to September 30, with an average daily high temperature above 87°F. The hottest day of the year is August 8, with an average high of 89°F and low of 77°F. The cool season lasts for 3.0 months, from December 6 to March 4, with an average daily high temperature below 78°F. The coldest day of the year is January 18, with an average low of 60°F and high of 75°F.” (Cedar Lake Ventures, 2018). See Appendix C for Chart of Average Temperature for Palmetto Bay. Palmetto Bay has 7.9 months of higher humidity rates with the months of April to December being the worst. See Appendix D for perceived humidity comfort level rates. The wet season in Palmetto Bay is from the tail end of May to the beginning of October, and can be observed on the graph of precipitation if you turn to Appendix D and E. According to the graphs from National Weather Service Forecast Office, 2018 is predicted to be in accordance to the typical May-October wet season, whereas 2017 continued its wet season into December, with precipitation rate about normal (National Weather Service, 2018).

Economic Conditions- According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2018, Miami has an overall unemployment rate of 4.0%, while Miami-Dade County has an unemployment rate of 4.3% and has an average weekly wage of $1,065. See Appendix F for Graph. The sales tax rate for Miami is 7.0% and the income tax rate for Miami is 0.0% (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018). According to the U.S. Census, in 2016, the median household income was $44,224 and having a person in poverty rate at 18.2%. The average persons per household are 3.07 and the median gross rent is $1,143 according to the U.S. Census (U.S Census Bureau, n.d).
Availability of Resources and Services- According to the Miami-Dade Public works, there are four different types of public transportation that are available to the public. These include the Metrobus, Metrorail, Metromover, and STS. The Metrobus is a system that provides services 365 days a year and serves all major shopping, entertainment, cultural centers, hospitals, schools, and is designed to intersect with the Metrorail and Metromover, making it easier to get from place to place. The bus also has special routes such as to the Marlins and Dolphins stadium during the peak sports season. The Metromover is a free, 4.4- mile system that connects with the Metrorail at two stations and the Metrobus at many stations downtown Miami and runs from 5 am to midnight 7 days a week according to MiamiDade.gov. “The Metrorail system is a 25-mile dual track, elevated rapid transit system that provides service to Miami International Airport (MIA) and runs from Kendall through South Miami, Coral Gables, and downtown Miami; to the Civic Center/Jackson Memorial Hospital area; and to Brownsville, Liberty City, Hialeah, and Medley in northwest Miami-Dade, with connections to Broward and Palm Beach counties at the Tri-Rail/Metrorail transfer station. The system currently uses 136 train cars. The 23 accessible Metrorail stations are about one mile apart, providing easy access for bus riders, pedestrians, and passengers who are dropped off and picked up.” (“Transit Miami-Dade”, 2018). The fourth system that Miami offers is the STS or Special Transportation service. STS is a service that was created in 1976 to meet the needs of citizens with disabilities or special accommodations. This service is also available to those that do not live in Miami and can be obtained through calling or emailing to confirm the accommodations. Both the application for residents as well as the information regarding STS/how to receive a waiver for non-residents in located on MiamiDade.gov. On the Miami-Dade Public Works website, all information regarding the Metro services can be found, along with maps, routes, schedules, and special advisories regarding changes. See Appendix G for service route.

The Miami Dade Government website also offers a list of the different departments that are available, including but not limited to, Police, Aviation, Corrections and Rehabilitation, Libraries, Parks and Recreation and many more. The contact information and information about each department can be found under the department’s tab. Public Works also include updates about adding things such as stop signs, traffic updates, water and electricity and much more. Miami- Dade also offers a wide variety of public city services that include trash and recycling, police, fire and rescue, as well as services on the water.
The Agency
Gaining a background in Recovery Bay will help one understand and appreciate what is done, how it is accomplished, and the benefits of the treatments for both long-term and short-term goals.
Description- The Recovery Bay serves Miami-Dade, specifically Palmetto Bay as well as any patient that has been referred to us. The treatment center sits on 3 acres of land and is a newer agency that first opened its doors in 2012. It is a state-owned and operated facility that receives funding from the state government as well as from grants, fundraisers and donations. Insurance and Medicare is accepted and will not turn anyone away due to monetary restrictions.

Our agency is a residential treatment facility that includes recreational therapy services to children ages 5-15. These children are at risk youth and/or have behavioral problems and we encompass treatment for all backgrounds of mental health/behavioral health. The agency provides psychiatry and psychology services, recreational therapy, nursing, and educational resources to help these children. The agency holds 50 beds and the services provided to each patient are specific to that patient’s needs. These children can stay anywhere from one day, one week, to months at a time. “The goal of mental health treatment is to assist the child to live successfully in their community and with their families” (Florida Department of Children and Families, 2018).

Mission and Vision- The Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Centers mission and vision statements can be located in Appendix H along with the core values, code of ethics and characteristics the agency is held to.

Accreditation-Accreditation is important for an agency to ensure that the agency follows strict guidelines and standards for quality of patient care and it allows the agency to be considered for federally funded programs and provides a framework for proper management. Evaluation and accreditation standards allow for an agency to both measure and develop the best means of treatment, evaluation, documentation, and implementation within the agency. It also allows the clients to know that they are receiving the best care possible because that agency has completed, by all means necessary, all the stipulations and evaluations that are required to be accredited. The Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center maintains the standards of and is accredited by CARF, JCAHO, CMS, and COA. Each agency has its own time frame for reaccreditation and assessments. The Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center fully complies with all regulations, annual evaluations, and random visits, allowing the accreditation agencies to complete and document any necessary changes or improvements that may or may not be needed. The treatment center also follows all state guidelines and statutes.
Administration and Structure- See Appendix I for the agency organizational chart. The administration of Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center includes the Executive Director, Board of Directors, Health Services (RN, ABA Technicians, Behavior Psychologist, Recreational Therapists etc.), Residential Care Facility Administration, and a few more. The full list of the administration can be found on the organizational chart. Each one of the directors is responsible for their department and oversees the supervisors and their staff. The Executive Director, also commonly known as the president or CEO, is responsible for a multitude of responsibilities, some of which include managing day-to-day responsibilities, ensuring that staff and therapists are up to date on licensures and certifications, manages staff for effective client outcomes, delegates responsibilities and roles to staff, oversees each department and that the department as a whole are following accreditation, state, and federal guidelines and standards, effectively negotiate contracts with community partners, staff, insurance companies etc., and lastly to form and uphold networks.
The Board of Directors and the Health Services Department, and the Residential Care Facility Administration are next in the line of administration. These areas include the Maintenance Director, Marketing Director, Human Resources Director, Director of Funding and Finance, Director of Health Services, Residential Team, and the Director of community relations. Every one of these areas is broken down with their own set of specific responsibilities and duties and each department has a supervisor, managers and staff to ensure that both the day to day as well as big-picture aspects of the team and optimally functioning. A more in-depth look at each department and their responsibilities can be seen in the annotations of Appendix I as well as in the Recreational Therapy Section located later on in the Comprehensive Program Plan. The Recreational Therapy department is included under the Health Services Department. The Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist is responsible for the Recreational Therapy Department and reports to the Health Services Director. Each department, including the RT department, accepts both interns and volunteers.
The Residential Care Facility Administration includes Maintenance Director, Director of Funding, and Director of Community Relations. Some of the duties associated with these areas include staffing security, all aspects of dining and meals, custodial staff, IT department, funding and contributions/fundraisers, community partners and many other responsibilities.
The residential team includes not only include the Recreational Therapy Department (as shown on chart) but also includes the RN’s, ABA Technicians, Behavior and Mental Health Psychologist, Psychiatrists, Educational Staff as well as any other day-to-day staff who see the clients for treatment.
Resources
Staff- The Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center staffs many different professions and disciplines that work together to provide the best treatment for all clients. These include psychologists, psychiatrists, registered nurses, ABA technicians, educational staff, and recreational therapists. All of the listed staff are on hand every day, except some are only available on weekdays. The staff is trained to provide individual treatment, group treatment and co-treatment with other disciplines. There is a physician on call, who is not on site, for any unforeseen circumstances or out of the ordinary situations requiring further medical attention. Although they are all vital members of the team and treatments, the facility cannot function with just these staff members. There are many other staff members that help with the day-to-day activities of the center. These staff members include, but are not limited to, custodial staff, cafeteria staff, administrators, security guards, secretary and many more.
The agency also accepts volunteers and Interns for many of the departments. The volunteers must be 18 years of age, and to begin the process they must first go to the Recovery Bay website, fill out and submit a volunteer form (see Appendix K), complete a background check, and attend orientation before they can begin volunteering. The volunteers can pick from a select list of volunteer opportunities including the aquatic center, dining hall, etc. and are protected under the FL Volunteer Protection Act. (See Appendix L) All interns are asked to email or call the internship coordinator at ***-***-**** or *******@recoverybay.com. All persons seeking internships will be guided from there as to what the qualifications include, how many interns are taken and when, and any other information regarding the process. Details about the Recreational Therapy Department internships will be found in the therapeutic recreation department section of this Comprehensive Program Plan.
Facilities- The facility, as said previously, is located on 3 acres of land in Palmetto Bay, south, of Miami Florida. The facilities have a building where the clients will stay, they are separated into a boy living area and a girl living area. Each side includes the beds, bathrooms, showers, and a therapy room that is used for either individual therapy sessions or a quiet room when needed. There is a “dining hall” where all the clients eat their meals and can get healthy snacks throughout the day if permitted. Although there is a dining hall where food is prepared for the clients, the clients learn to cook by cooking each a breakfast, lunch, and dinner meal at least once a week with the educational staff. There is a gymnasium building that includes a basketball court,a small exercise room, 2 smaller rooms for group therapy sessions and locker rooms/bathrooms. All of the equipment is stored in a storage closet and is open for use for all staff members to work with clients as well as for clients to use during free time. The equipment is monitored and can only be used if it is checked in and out. The equipment can be used by all disciplines and is used for leisure activities as well as therapy. There is an administrative building which is at the front of the campus, contains offices and where new clients check in, are brought in, and are checked out when discharged. This is also where all previous client’s medical records are kept, under lock and key and can only be accessed when deemed necessary by medical staff who have the right to view the chart, or if the client returns to the facility for additional treatments. The facility includes a medical ward for any medical needs or injuries and is staffed 24/7.

As the agency expands and includes more disciplines and increases the number of beds available, the agency hopes to add on to the facilities that are currently available. For now, they are partnered with outside agencies for activities such as hippotherapy, aquatic therapy, and community outings.

Budget- Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center currently is funded by the state of Florida and grants from the federal government. Many state-funded treatment centers provide services to those in need who may not have insurance, cannot afford it on their own, or simply need financial help due to a variety of circumstances as well as provide services for court-mandated reasons. Funding is a large focus area and even a problem because the state does not provide all the money needed for everything that is wanted to be done. According to Aion Recovery, “Up-to-date evidenced-based treatments may not be offered as these programs do not have the funding required to upgrade treatment practices.” (“State-Funded Rehab and Other Free Programs in Florida”, 2018). This is why the Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center also receives and reaches out for funding from other grants, fundraisers, and donations. The agency cannot run without the funding nor can it provide for its clients or staff. It is imperative that funds are raised and allocated to only those areas deemed necessary. According to Florida Department of Children and family, the agency is required to review applications monthly to ensure the clients fit within the scopes of the severity of the problems of the child, financial means of the family, the availability of needed residential care, and available funds. “All available sources of funds are explored, including insurance (public and private) and cost-sharing with the family, the local school district, and other programs involved with the child, such as child welfare and juvenile justice.” (Florida Department of Children and Families, 2018). See Appendix M for an example of a Funding Opportunity. See Appendix N for Item Line Budget.
The Clients
Quantity- The Recovery Bay Residential Treatment center will serve between 50-75 Children quarterly depending on the turnaround and available resources/beds. We have some children that stay for a week while others stay for months at a time, it depends on the severity of their problems and what each child needs. We estimate each year that there will be at least 200 clients seen annually. This number may be higher or lower.
Description of Clients (Demographics, Diagnosis/Disabilities)- There is a large Hispanic population in Miami, therefore many of the clients that will be seen either speak English and another language or they only speak one language. Many of these children will come from lower income to impoverished families, but also a large amount of the children come from higher-income families as well. Miami and Recovery Bay see a large range of socioeconomic statuses and a wide variety of family backgrounds that have different occupations, cultural differences, and educational variances. Our staff are trained in cultural compliance and are open to anyone who receives treatment.
We serve children ages 5-15 with mental health and behavioral health concerns that need closer attention. We tend to see more girls than boys, but there is no major difference as it depends on the type of disorder that the present with and the backgrounds from which we receive clients from. The severity varies from slight disorders or early onset symptoms that need a small amount of intervention to very severe that need consistent interventions. Some of the most common mental health disorders we see at this particular agency include depression, anxiety, autism, ADHD, self-injurious behaviors, suicidal thoughts, PTSD, history of abuse, and eating disorders. Many of the disorders we see are comorbid and we treat all symptoms that the child is presenting. The children come from all different backgrounds leading to their disorders presenting themselves differently than another child at the treatment center. Typically, when the children have a secondary condition, we most commonly see an eating disorder that occurs along with anxiety or depression.
When the clients come to see us, many of them live at home, some are in foster care, and others live with a relative other than their biological mom or dad. When the children are discharged, where the child will live is determined on a case by case basis. Some children are referred to group homes, some return to their family (we offer family counseling to try and place each child back with their guardians) and others remain in another type of treatment setting until they are ready. When the children come from less than optimal living situations, the Department of Social Services becomes involved and we work together to make the best decision for the patient where they will be living.

Leisure Related Needs- One of our main focuses at Residential Bay is on leisure activities. We do not see a vast majority of children with physical disabilities, although it is not uncommon as we treat patients with brain injuries, we are able to provide a large variety of leisure activities. We encourage and modify all activities to fit the needs of each client and no one is turned away because of a mental or physical disability. We provide each client with leisure education, leisure resources, leisure skills, and social interaction. The purpose of leisure within our agency is to provide each client with activities they can take with them when discharged and provide them with community resources that will be available to them. Not all of the clients enjoy the same leisure activities, so we provide a long list that they are able to choose from. Some of these include animal-assisted therapy, meditation, journaling, therapeutic outings in the community, yoga, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy specifically dialectical behavior therapy, and sensory interventions. We frame our leisure activities as well as group/individual therapy to be open and inviting. These activities can help both primary and secondary disorders, and we teach the children all about what leisure is, why it’s important and help them find things they used to enjoy as well as new activities. Many of the clients that are seen will also be involved in social skills training to ensure they leave with the abilities to participate in leisure activities appropriately. These children need intervention and leisure activities of some sort daily. They are required to participate in activities each day along with their group and/or individual therapy sessions. Many of the clients will need to participate in anger management classes and taught coping skills in order to appropriately respond to a variety of situations. With that being said, we encourage all clients to express their feelings and emotions in order to overcome their problems and work towards achieving their individual goals and objectives. The involvement in these activities provides the children with a framework of how to participate, activities that are healthy and beneficial, and provides them with a sense of security and purpose. We provide these activities to promote a sense of well-being, autonomy and increase self-esteem.
Appendix A: Map Showing Miami and Palmetto Bay
383349612437083334176240794832164562271868
http://www.floridacountiesmap.com/dade_county.shtmlAppendix B: Climate of Miami, FL
  Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
Average high in °F: 76 78 80 83 87 89
Average low in °F: 60 62 65 68 73 76
Av. precipitation in inch: 1.61 2.24 2.99 3.15 5.35 9.69
Days with precipitation: 6 5 6 7 10 13
Hours of sunshine: 222 227 266 275 280 251
  Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Average high in °F: 91 91 89 86 82 78
Average low in °F: 77 77 76 74 68 63
Av. precipitation in inch: 6.5 8.9 9.84 6.34 3.27 2.05
Appendix C:

Appendix D
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https://www.usclimatedata.com/climate/miami/florida/united-states/usfl0316-Appendix E
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https://www.usclimatedata.com/climate/miami/florida/united-states/usfl0316-Appendix F
https://www.bls.gov/regions/southeast/summary/blssummary_miami.pdfAppendix G: The schedule and routes can be found on the Miami-Dade Government website. They will appear as below, and any route/schedule can be selected from the drop-down menu.

https://www.miamidade.gov/transit/rail_schedules_results.asp?station_selected=PAL&ServiceSelected=WEEKDAY%27%20OR%20SERVICE%20=%20%27MON-THUAppendix H
Mission and Vision Statement of Recovery Bay Residential Treatment Center:
Mission- To educate youth with mental and/or behavioral health problems and their guardians on creating and implementing healthy and dynamic leisure activities in a safe atmosphere.

Vision- To set the bar of delivering excellent patient and family focused therapeutic recreation programs that promote well-being, autonomy, and cohesiveness to ensure independence post discharge.
ATRA Code of Ethics:
PRINCIPLE 1: BENEFICENCE
Recreational Therapy personnel shall treat persons served in an ethical manner by actively making efforts to provide for their well-being by maximizing possible benefits and relieving, lessening, or minimizing possible harm.

 
PRINCIPLE 2: NON-MALEFICENCE
Recreational Therapy personnel have an obligation to use their knowledge, skills, abilities, and judgment to help persons while respecting their decisions and protecting them from harm.

 
PRINCIPLE 3: AUTONOMY
Recreational Therapy personnel have a duty to preserve and protect the right of each individual to make his/her own choices. Each individual is to be given the opportunity to determine his/her own course of action in accordance with a plan freely chosen. In the case of individuals who are unable to exercise autonomy with regard to their care, recreational therapy personnel have the duty to respect the decisions of their qualified legal representative.

 
PRINCIPLE 4: JUSTICE
Recreational Therapy personnel are responsible for ensuring that individuals are served fairly and that there is equity in the distribution of services. Individuals should receive services without regard to race, color, creed, gender, sexual orientation, age, disease/disability, social and financial status.

 
PRINCIPLE 5: FIDELITY
Recreational Therapy personnel have an obligation, first and foremost, to be loyal, faithful, and meet commitments made to persons receiving services. In addition, Recreational Therapy personnel have a secondary obligation to colleagues, agencies, and the profession.

 
PRINCIPLE 6: VERACITY
Recreational Therapy personnel shall be truthful and honest. Deception, by being dishonest or omitting what is true, should always be avoided.

 
PRINCIPLE 7: INFORMED CONSENT
Recreational Therapy personnel should provide services characterized by mutual respect and shared decision making. These personnel are responsible for providing each individual receiving service with information regarding the services, benefits, outcomes, length of treatment, expected activities, risk and limitations, including the professional’s training and credentials. Informed consent is obtained when information needed to make a reasoned decision is provided by the professional to competent persons seeking services who then decide whether or not to accept the treatment.

 
PRINCIPLE 8: CONFIDENTIALITY & PRIVACY
Recreational Therapy personnel have a duty to disclose all relevant information to persons seeking services: they also have a corresponding duty not to disclose private information to third parties. If a situation arises that requires disclosure of confidential information about an individual (i.e.: to protect the individual’s welfare or the interest of others) the professional has the responsibility to inform the individual served of the circumstances.

 
PRINCIPLE 9: COMPETENCE
Recreational Therapy personnel have the responsibility to maintain and improve their knowledge related to the profession and demonstrate current, competent practice to persons served. In addition, personnel have an obligation to maintain their credential.

 
PRINCIPLE 10:  COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS AND REGULATIONS
Recreational Therapy personnel are responsible for complying with local, state and federal laws, regulations and ATRA policies governing the profession of Recreational Therapy.

 
Revised by the ATRA Board of Directors | July 2009
 
Appendix I
12854615928001-1713956934283Intern(s)
00Intern(s)
688864682879018808706940854Volunteer(s)
0Volunteer(s)
177482569483637810506047270CTRS: 1 Head Therapist, 4 Staff Therapists
0CTRS: 1 Head Therapist, 4 Staff Therapists
7818235410808Recreational Therapy
00Recreational Therapy
12854615279224001285461627255819443952195611721195276441201279554824121819956224011929995401361196599559468120595956782012077595745881Each Recreational therapist will have one intern per semester (Fall, Spring, Summer) and will have volunteers throughout the calendar year, the number depending on the circumstances. There are two RTA (recreational therapy assistants) to assist the CTRS daily.
Appendix J:
CARF publishes standards manuals in the following areas: 
Aging Services (including Continuing Care Retirement Communities)
Behavioral Health
Business and Services Management Networks
Child and Youth Services
Employment and Community Services
Medical Rehabilitation (including DMEPOS)
Opioid Treatment Program
Vision Rehabilitation Services
*CARF standards are available for Purchase on their website
http://www.carf.org/Accreditation/QualityStandards
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Appendix K

https://www.template.net/business/application-form-template/sample-volunteer-application-template/
Appendix L:

http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=0700-0799/0768/Sections/0768.1355.html
Appendix M: From Request for Applications (RFA) No. TI-14-005

https://www.ascensionrs.com/how-to-start-a-residential-treatment-center.html

References
About Miami-Dade County. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www8.miamidade.gov/global/disclaimer/about-miami-dade-county.pageC. (n.d.). Average Weather in Palmetto Bay. Retrieved from https://weatherspark.com/y/18640/Average-Weather-in-Palmetto-Bay-Florida-United-States-Year-RoundMiami- Dade County at a Glance. (n.d.). Retrieved 2018, from http://www.miamidade.gov/information/library/at-a-glance.pdfMiami, Florida Population 2018. (n.d.). Retrieved September 25, 2018, from http://worldpopulationreview.com/us-cities/miami-population/Miami: Geography and Climate. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/us-cities/The-South/Miami-Geography-and-Climate.html#ixzz5SIpBZFO8
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U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Miami city, Florida; Miami-Dade County, Florida. (n.d.). Retrieved September 25, 2018, from https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/miamicityflorida,miamidadecountyflorida/PST045217

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