Artists from both movements used variation of light and shade to create emotion as seen in Romantic painting “Wanderer above the sea of fog” by Casper David Fredrick

Artists from both movements used variation of light and shade to create emotion as seen in Romantic painting “Wanderer above the sea of fog” by Casper David Fredrick, 1818 (Friedrich, 1818) and to create volume in Baroque painting “The night Watch” by Rembrandt Van Rijin, 1642. Though both movements used color contrasts of light and shade as mentioned, the Baroque artists utilized this style more whereas the Romantics utilized intense colors and loose brush strokes more (“Romanticism,” 2014). There was also a feeling of movement and energy displayed in paintings from the Baroque “Rape of the Sabine Women” (“Nicolas Poussin | The Rape of the Sabine Women (1637-1638) | Artsy,” n.d.) and the Romantic “Raft of the Medusa” (“Théodore Géricault | The Raft of the Medusa (1818-1819) | Artsy,” n.d.) Themes of the two paintings mentioned above were dramatic and dream-like, both expressing subjects of despair drawn from the concept of social aspects that were present in both the Baroque and the Romantic art movements.